Tag Archives: federal politics

Open letter to Chrystia Freeland on Israel “regularization bill”

The Canadian BDS Coaliton coordinated the following open letter to Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland on the passage of Israel’s so-called Regularization Bill.

March 20, 2017

The Honourable Chrystia Freeland
Minister of Foreign Affairs,
House of Commons,
Ottawa K1A 0A6

Dear Minister Freeland:

We come together to express our grave concern regarding actions taken by the government of Israel since the passage of UN Security Council Resolution 2334, and to call the Canadian government to take a strong stance against the Israeli government’s flagrant disregard of its responsibility as an occupying power under the Fourth Geneva Convention.

The February 6, 2017 passing by the Knesset of the Regularization Bill shows utter disdain of the Security Council and for International Human Rights and Humanitarian Laws. This legislation allows for retroactive expropriation of private Palestinian land, resulting in the legalization of over 4,000 settler homes, along with the ability to seize privately owned Palestinian land for the creation of new, and/or expansion of, existing illegal settlements. Continue reading

Confused about the Green Party’s position on BDS? You’re not the only one.

A great deal of confusion emerged out of the Green Party of Canada’s December 3 – 5 Special General Meeting in Calgary. In this article for rabble.ca, CJPME president Thomas Woodley tries to make sense of it all.

Green Party compromise on BDS motion offers win for everyone — and plenty of confusion

The Green Party convention this past weekend offered a win for everyone. Sort of.

The convention was held to clarify the Greens’ position vis-à-vis economic pressure on Israel for its human rights abuses. Green leader Elizabeth May was so opposed to an August resolution condemning Israel’s human rights abuses that she had threatened to resign. Influential party activists sought to preserve their August win while maintaining party unity.

A “compromise” resolution endorsed in advance by both party brass and influential grassroots activists suggested that everyone could have what they wanted. Green leader Elizabeth May got her wish to remove reference to the international Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) movement, while human rights activists were able to retain strong language censuring Israel’s human rights abuses against Palestinians.

But even though the compromise resolution passed with the support of 84 per cent of the members, the message coming out of the convention was anything but clear. Continue reading